Thoughts from the Publisher : So what’s new?

neena strichartThe deadline is fast approaching for those of you who still haven’t turned in your survey regarding the proposed tenants at the new Bixby Point shopping center (southeast corner of Carson Street and Atlantic Avenue).
As I’ve said before this is your chance to be heard and to help shape the shopping and dining opportunities in your community. According to the folks at Bolour & Associates they have received hundreds of surveys—yet they are hoping for many more in order to utilize them as a marketing tool to entice the businesses preferred by you—the local residents.
Take a look at the survey on page 3. Check out the Web site listed beside each proposed tenant. See if it fits your needs and the wants and needs of the neighborhood—then fill out the form and send it in as soon as you can.
How wonderful it will be to see businesses we have requested occupy that beautiful new center. If we don’t speak up we may face more of the sameness that already surrounds us and eats up our valuable retail real estate. Let’s go for different, fresh and unique. Who knows, if we play our cards right we may find Bixby Knolls has resurrected itself and come full circle as the shining thriving retail corridor it was in the ’50s and ’60s (see the Reminiscing picture on page 2 for a reminder).
Remember the Crest Theatre, Welch’s and Alfred’s restaurants? The names may change but we can recreate the area to be whatever we want it to be. All we need to do is step up and speak up. Thanks for listening and for taking advantage of a marvelous opportunity to be heard.
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Today is my 52nd birthday. Happy birthday to me.
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Our office will be closed on Monday to allow our staff to observe Memorial Day. We will be open regular hours Friday and Tuesday.
According to www.USMemorialDay.org Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was first observed May 30, 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.
The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).
It is now celebrated in almost every state on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90—363) to ensure a three-day weekend for federal holidays).

Thoughts From The Publisher

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